Tag: creativity

Overcoming the Research Roadblock

red stop sign

Research can either make or break a story, so we writers have to get it right. Time periods, cultures, social/government systems, technology—anything in your story that ranges beyond your area of expertise is going to require some intensive research. I learned this the hard… Continue Reading “Overcoming the Research Roadblock”

The Writer’s Creative Conscience: staying Accountable

Every writer has a creative conscience. By “creative conscience,” I don’t mean a moral compass that dictates what we do and don’t create. I mean a still, small voice that haunts us when we aren’t creating and hounds us for not achieving milestones. The… Continue Reading “The Writer’s Creative Conscience: staying Accountable”

YouTube and Inkpots: what they have in common

Starting a YouTube channel can be one of the most motivating or deflating experiences in a writer’s career. Just like writing your first couple of blog posts and waiting for things to happen, you can post your first YouTube video and then… why doesn’t… Continue Reading “YouTube and Inkpots: what they have in common”

Developing New Skills and Defeating Demons

Before developing new skills this year, it’s helpful to take stock of your existing inventory. Basically, before moving forward, you need to know where you are now. Taking a personal inventory is helpful for more than just skill development. Examining our minds and hearts… Continue Reading “Developing New Skills and Defeating Demons”

Creative Projects: the more, the merrier?

Creative projects are like children: the more there are, the harder it is to keep track of them all. For artists, this often leads to a physical mess, where the materials for their various creative projects get all mixed up or scattered around the… Continue Reading “Creative Projects: the more, the merrier?”

Of Saplings and Stories: What We can Learn

When I’m not writing stories, I work with trees. Let’s be clear: I’m not the one cutting trees down or doctoring them up—no, no, you will not see me wielding a chainsaw or fertilizer. Instead, I run the marketing and communications department for a… Continue Reading “Of Saplings and Stories: What We can Learn”

If My Book were a Child

crib room toy bed

If my book were a child, I would think it most darling for nudging me with ideas while only half-conceived. “I hope you look like me,” I would tell it with fondness. For this unborn book would carry my name. And if my book… Continue Reading “If My Book were a Child”

What Young Writers can Teach Us

handshake with young writer

When I first met an 11-year-old writer who runs his own newspaper, I felt seriously behind on life. Those who know me have heard me complain about how old I feel at 22. In fact, one of my father’s friends tried to console me… Continue Reading “What Young Writers can Teach Us”

Illustrations that Breathe a Children’s Book to Life

I will never forget the first pictures I saw of my children’s book—pictures I didn’t draw. Oh, I’d storyboarded and thrown together some third-grade quality sketches, but I had yet to meet my own character face-to-face on a page. Or should I say, face-to-foot?… Continue Reading “Illustrations that Breathe a Children’s Book to Life”

Storyboarding a Children’s Book

girls on desk looking at notebook

When was the last time you picked up a children’s book to study the pictures? I’ll admit, I hadn’t even touched a children’s book for a long time when I decided to write one of my own. This meant I had a lot to… Continue Reading “Storyboarding a Children’s Book”