Tag: writing

Overcoming the Research Roadblock

red stop sign

Research can either make or break a story, so we writers have to get it right. Time periods, cultures, social/government systems, technology—anything in your story that ranges beyond your area of expertise is going to require some intensive research. I learned this the hard… Continue Reading “Overcoming the Research Roadblock”

Getting a Script Noticed

vintage typewriter and telephone on the table

Submitting a script for production and submitting a novel for publication require different things. If you’ve read my article on making the “pitch” for a script, you already know this process can be uniquely intimidating. Impressing powerful people always is. Even so, there’s plenty… Continue Reading “Getting a Script Noticed”

A Blogging Milestone: the 100th Post

person standing on hand rails with arms wide open facing the mountains and clouds

Two years ago, the term “blogging milestone” seemed ridiculous—even pretentious. The last blogging milestone I made a post about was the 30th one, in February of 2020, which was more like an announcement of The Inquisitive Inkpot’s identity shift. I don’t think even after… Continue Reading “A Blogging Milestone: the 100th Post”

Confessions of a Covid-stricken Writer

crop unrecognizable female feet lying in cozy bed

I thought covid would give me an unparalleled chance to keep writing. How wrong I was. Days before I received my positive covid test results, I had struck a gold mine of creative energy. My second children’s book has been progressing toward publication, and… Continue Reading “Confessions of a Covid-stricken Writer”

Evaluating Illustration Thumbnails

Easter, Sunshine, and Thumbnails: who could ask for anything more? This beautiful, sunny Easter weekend was made even more enthralling when my illustrator sent me the complete set of thumbnails for Bertrand the Bashful Bumblebee—my next children’s book, on track to be released this… Continue Reading “Evaluating Illustration Thumbnails”

The Writer’s Creative Conscience: staying Accountable

Every writer has a creative conscience. By “creative conscience,” I don’t mean a moral compass that dictates what we do and don’t create. I mean a still, small voice that haunts us when we aren’t creating and hounds us for not achieving milestones. The… Continue Reading “The Writer’s Creative Conscience: staying Accountable”

The Secret Character Arc

Every good story needs a character arc. Plot arc and character arc—those are the two essential ingredients in any story. Without those two, you have something less than quality storytelling. What I’ve noticed, though, is that not all characters see their own arc. Now… Continue Reading “The Secret Character Arc”

The Power of the Pitch

Have you ever had to pitch an idea to someone? Of course you have. We pitch ideas to other people all the time, whether we realize it or not. Whether you get what you want out of it is a whole separate question. Authors… Continue Reading “The Power of the Pitch”

Developing New Skills and Defeating Demons

Before developing new skills this year, it’s helpful to take stock of your existing inventory. Basically, before moving forward, you need to know where you are now. Taking a personal inventory is helpful for more than just skill development. Examining our minds and hearts… Continue Reading “Developing New Skills and Defeating Demons”

An Unexpected Children’s Book Series

bee on a yellow flower

It’s official: what I had thought would be a one-off project has turned into a franchise. I am creating a children’s book series! No, this is not a continuation of Melvin the Missing Sock—it’s a collection of stories dedicated to teaching kids vocabulary and… Continue Reading “An Unexpected Children’s Book Series”